Medication assisted treatment

The Council is committed to facilitating treatment options and therapies to address OUD & SUD -- chronic diseases with long-lasting effects.

Help is available to successfully overcome opioid addiction

According to the FDA, Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is the use of medications in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, which is effective in the treatment of opioid use disorders (OUD) as well as substance use disorders (SUD) and can help some people to sustain recovery.

Per the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, research shows that, for some people, the integration of both behavioral and pharmacologic (medical) types of treatment is the most effective approach for overcoming opioid addiction. A common misconception is that medications used in medication-assisted treatment (MAT) substitute one drug for another.

Man greeting sunrise

Treatment options

The National Institute on Drug Abuse lists several options that exist for the successful treating of drug addiction, including:

  • Behavioral counseling
  • Medications
  • Medical devices and applications to treat withdrawal symptoms or provide skills training
  • Evaluation and treatment for co-occurring mental health issues such as depression and anxiety
  • Long-term follow-up to prevent relapse

The Council understands that a range of care services with a tailored treatment program and follow-up options are crucial to success.

Resources

Welcome to Illinois Helpline

The Illinois Helpline for Opioids and Other Substances is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration through the Opioid State Targeted Response grant administered by the Illinois Department of Human Services, Division of Substance Use Prevention and Recovery.

helplineil.org

Opioids | National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Opioids are a class of drugs that include the illegal drug heroin as well as pain relievers available legally by prescription, such as oxycodone (OxyContin®), hydrocodone (Vicodin®), codeine, morphine, and many others. These drugs are chemically related and interact with opioid receptors on nerve cells in the body and brain. Opioid pain relievers are generally safe…

www.drugabuse.gov

Opioid Basics | Drug Overdose | CDC Injury Center

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid pain reliever. It is many times more powerful than other opioids and is approved for treating severe pain, typically advanced cancer pain. 1 Illegally made and distributed fentanyl has been on the rise in several states.

www.cdc.gov

HHS.gov/Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic

Opioid information for health professionals and families. Common opioids include heroin and prescription drugs like oxycodone, hydrocodone and fentanyl.

www.hhs.gov

Medication and Counseling Treatment | SAMHSA – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the use of medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to provide a “whole-patient” approach to the treatment of substance use disorders. Research shows that a combination of medication and therapy can successfully treat these disorders, and for some people struggling with addiction, MAT can help sustain…

www.samhsa.gov

Information about Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT)

Information about Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is the use of medications in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, which is effective in …

www.fda.gov

Medication Assisted Treatment – National Council

In the midst of the opioid epidemic, communities across the country face increased demands for prevention and substance use services. The CDC reports that:. Young adult’s heroin use more than doubled in the past decade.; More than 90 percent of people who use heroin also use at least one other drug.; 45 percent of people who use heroin are also addicted to …

www.thenationalcouncil.org

How does Medication-Assisted Treatment help with opioid addiction?

Doctor speaking with patient

The use of Vivitrol, Suboxone or Methadone, coupled with counseling, is an evidence-based approach and the preferred treatment for heroin and other opioids.

drugfree.org

Evidence-Based Treatment and Recovery Strategies for Opioid Use Disorder:

http://Evidence-Based Treatment and Recovery Strategies for Opioid Use Disorder:

 

Intervention and Treatment:

Illinois also has a 24 hour helpline devoted to connecting individuals to treatment for OUD and other SUDs. If you need help for yourself, or on behalf of a loved one, call 1-833-2FINDHELP.

Advocates For Opioid recovery:

In June of 2016, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, former Congressman Patrick Kennedy, and noted civil rights activist Van Jones teamed up to create Advocates for Opioid Recovery, an initiative focused squarely on promoting the evidence-based interventions that can have a dramatic impact on ending the opioid addiction and overdose crisis in this country. Advocates for Opioid Recovery is dedicated to educating key influencers on how medication-assisted treatment is a far more effective way of delivering long-term recovery than abstinence-only rehab, which has an 80% failure rate.

Recovery and the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder – A Pharmacist’s Perspective:

PDF

The Opioid ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) project is a cost-free partnership between primary care providers and Indiana University specialists to improve the treatment of opioid use disorders in rural and underserved areas.

https://oudecho.iu.edu/tracks/prescribers/presentations.php

Medication-Assisted Treatment Overview: Naltrexone, Methadone & Suboxone l The Partnership

Dr. Edwin A. Salsitz, Medical Director, Office Based Opioid Therapy, Beth Israel Medical Center and Dr. Josh Hersh, Staff Psychiatrist, Miami University Student Counseling Services, discuss Medication-Assisted Treatment. Addiction is a brain disease and can be successfully treated with Medication-Assisted Treatment such as Naltrexone, Methadone and Suboxone. These medications can normalize and stabilize the brain and improve brain function so that recovery can be met. Dr. Salsitz reminds us all that “all treatments work for some people. No one treatment works for everyone.”

These services are funded in full or in part through a State Opioid Response (SOR) Grant (TIO81699) to the Illinois Department of Human Services, Division of Substance Use Prevention and Recovery (IDHS/SUPR), from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (HHS/SAMHSA).

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