The South Suburban Council is a leader in Treatment and Recovery Support for those experiencing Opioid Addiction (Opioid Use Disorder {OUD}). We offer innovative and comprehensive evidence based treatment options including dedicated Recovery Coach’s and Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT). The Council strongly encourages you to fully utilize these tools to better understand OUD, better prepare for treatment and ultimately invest in a more successful recovery. These tools and services are provided by The Council at no charge to those needing the assistance. Once you are provided a Recovery Coach you will have 24 hour access to their services and 24 hour access to our dedicated Help Line (773.343.3510).

833.2FINDHELP Illinois Helpline

This toolkit has proven to be effective in the identification and treatment of OUD. The goal of this toolkit is to support the screening for, recognition of and treatment of OUD.

What is Opioid Use Disorder (OUD)? Opioid Use Disorder

Opioids And Substance Abuse: What Can We Do?

SAMHSA Opioid Prevention Toolkit (PDF)

Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit

Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit (Spanish)

Tips for Teens: The Truth About Heroin


What are opioids?

Opioids are a type of medicine often used to help relieve pain. They work by lowering the number of pain signals your body sends to your brain. They also change how your brain responds to pain. Doctors most often prescribe opioids to relieve pain from:

  • toothaches and dental procedures
  • injuries
  • surgeries
  • chronic conditions such as cancer

Some prescription cough medicines also contain opioids.

Opioids usually are safe when you use them correctly. But people who do not follow their doctor’s instructions and those who misuse opioids can become addicted. Misusing opioids means that you don’t follow your doctor’s instructions for how to take the medicine. It can also mean that you take the drug illegally.

What is addiction?

Addiction is a disease that affects your brain and your behavior. At first, you have control over your choice to start using drugs. If you misuse a drug, its pleasurable effect eventually makes you want to keep using it. Over time, your brain actually changes in certain ways so that you develop a powerful urge to use the drug.

Opioid drugs include:

  • opium
  • codeine
  • fentanyl
  • heroin
  • hydrocodone
  • hydromorphone
  • methadone
  • morphine
  • oxycodone
  • oxymorphone
  • paregoric
  • sufentanil
  • tramadol

Symptoms of opioid addiction

The first step toward recovery is recognizing that you have a problem with opioids. The signs and symptoms of substance abuse can be physical, behavioral, and psychological. One clear sign of addiction is not being able to stop using the substance. It is also not being able to stop yourself from using more than the recommended amount.

Other signs and symptoms of opioid abuse include:

  • poor coordination
  • drowsiness
  • shallow or slow breathing rate
  • nausea, vomiting
  • constipation
  • physical agitation
  • poor decision making
  • abandoning responsibilities
  • slurred speech
  • sleeping more or less than normal
  • mood swings
  • euphoria (feeling high)
  • irritability
  • depression
  • lowered motivation
  • anxiety attacks

Symptoms of opioid overdose

An overdose of opioids requires immediate emergency medical treatment. If you suspect someone has overdosed on opioids, call 9-1-1 immediately. In some states, a prescription nasal spray called naloxone (Narcan) is available to keep on hand in case of an opioid overdose. Talk to your doctor to see if you might need this medicine.

Symptoms of an overdose include:

  • unresponsive (can’t wake)
  • slow, erratic (irregular) breathing, or no breathing at all
  • slow, erratic pulse, or no pulse
  • vomiting
  • loss of consciousness (passing out)
  • constricted (small) pupils

What causes opioid addiction?

Opioid drugs alter your brain by creating artificial endorphins. Besides blocking pain, these endorphins make you feel good. Too much opioid use can cause your brain to rely on these artificial endorphins. Once your brain does this, it can even stop producing its own endorphins. The longer you use opioids, the more likely this is to happen. You also will need more opioids over time because of drug tolerance.

What is drug tolerance?

Drug tolerance is when your body, over time, gets used to the effects of a drug. As this happens, you may need to take a higher dose of the drug to get the same effect. When you take opioids over time, you need a higher does to get the same pain relief.

If you stop using an opioid for a period of time, your tolerance will begin to fade. If you need to begin taking it again, you most likely will not need your former higher dose. That can be too much for the body to take. If you stop taking a medication, and then resume, talk to your doctor about dosage.

What is drug dependence?

Drug dependence is when the way your body works changes because you have taken a drug for a long time. These changes cause you to have withdrawal symptoms when you stop using the drug. Withdrawal symptoms can be mild or severe, and may include:

  • sweating
  • nausea or vomiting
  • chills
  • diarrhea
  • shaking
  • pain
  • depression
  • insomnia
  • fatigue

If you have been taking a prescription opioid for a long time, work with your doctor. Your doctor can help you avoid withdrawal symptoms by gradually lowering your dose over time until you no longer need the medicine.

What is the difference between drug tolerance, dependence, and addiction?

Drug tolerance and dependence are a normal part of taking any opioid drug for a long time. You can be tolerant to, or dependent on, a drug and not yet be addicted to it.

Addiction, however, is not normal. It is a disease. You are addicted to a drug when it seems that neither your body nor your mind can function without the drug. Addiction causes you to obsessively seek out the drug, even when the drug use causes behavior, health, or relationship problems.

How do I know if I’m addicted?

You might be addicted if you crave the drug or if you feel like you can’t control the urge to take the drug. You may also be addicted if you keep using the drug without your doctor’s consent, even if the drug is causing trouble for you. The trouble may be with your health, with money, with work or school, with the law, or with your relationships with family or friends. Your friends and family may be aware of your addiction problem before you are. They notice the changes in your behavior.

How is opioid addiction diagnosed?

Your doctor or a medical health professional can diagnose opioid addiction. Diagnosis will include a medical assessment. It also often includes testing for mental health disorders.

Can opioid addiction be prevented or avoided?

Many people are able to use opioids safely without becoming addicted to them. But their potential for addiction is high. This is especially true if you use them for long-term pain management.

In general, you are more likely to avoid addiction if you can use opioid drugs no longer than a week. Research shows that using them for more than a month can make you dependent on them.

Opioid addiction treatment

Treatment for opioid addiction is different for each person. The main goal of treatment is to help you stop using the drug. Treatment also can help you avoid using it again in the future.

When you stop using opioids, your body will react. You will have a number of symptoms that may include nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, and anxiety. This reaction is called withdrawal.

Your doctor can prescribe certain medicines to help relieve your withdrawal symptoms when you stop using opioids. They also will help control your cravings. These medicines include methadone (often used to treat heroin addiction), buprenorphine, and naltrexone.

Methadone and buprenorphine help reduce withdrawal symptoms by targeting the same centers in the brain that opioids target. Only they do not make you feel high. They help restore balance to your brain and allow it to heal. According to National Institutes of Health (NIH), you may safely take the medicines long term, even for a lifetime. You should not quit them without first telling your doctor.

Naltrexone is another medicine your doctor may prescribe. This medicine doesn’t help you stop taking opioids. It is for helping prevent you from relapsing. Relapsing means to start taking opioids again.  This medicine is different from methadone and buprenorphine because it does not help with cravings or withdrawal. Instead, according to NIH, it prevents you from feeling the high you would normally feel when you take opioids.

Medicine can help with your physical addition to opioids. But you may also need help with your mental or emotional addition to opioids. Behavioral treatments can help you learn how to manage depression. These treatments also help you avoid opioids, deal with cravings, and heal damaged relationships. Some behavioral treatments include individual counseling, group or family counseling, and cognitive therapy. Ask your doctor for a recommendation.

Living with opioid addiction

If you think you are addicted to opioids, know that there is help for you. The first step in breaking addiction is realizing that you control your own behavior.

The following steps will help you fight your addiction:

  1. Commit to quitting. Take control of your behavior and commit to fighting your addictions.
  2. Get help from your doctor. He or she can be your biggest ally, even if you’re trying to quit a drug he or she prescribed. Your doctor may be able to prescribe medicine that will help ease your cravings for the addictive drug. Talking with your doctor or a counselor about your problems and your drug use can be helpful, too.
  3. Get support. Certain organizations are dedicated to helping people who have addictions. They want you to succeed and will give you the tools and support you need to quit and move on with your life. Ask your family and friends for support, too.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • How can I prevent getting addicted to opioids?
  • Is the medicine I’m taking addictive?
  • How do I know if I’m addicted to an opioid?
  • What should I do if I think I’m addicted to an opioid?
  • How do I know if a friend of family member is addicted to an opioid?

SUD, OUD & Medication Assisted Treatment

Recovery Coach

Recovery Coach Brochure

U.S. Surgeon General – Spotlight on Opioids:

Opioid Abuse and Addiction:

Helpful Links

Contact Us

Narcan Training Video:

How To Get Narcan

ILLINOIS HELPLINE FOR OPIOIDS AND OTHER SUBSTANCES

What are the symptoms of opioid use disorder (OUD)?

Opiate Withdrawal – What It Is and How to Cope with It:

Opioid Risk Tool

CDC – Opioid Basics

Crisis Text Helpline

Contact The South Suburban Council for ALL your Opioid Addiction (OUD) Questions and Concerns.

The South Suburban Council Central Intake: 708.647.3333

These services are funded in full or in part through a State Opioid Response (SOR) Grant (TIO81699) to the Illinois Department of Human Services, Division of Substance Use Prevention and Recovery (IDHS/SUPR), from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (HHS/SAMHSA).

Fair Use Act Disclaimer: This site is for educational purposes only. Fair Use: Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Fair Use Definition: Fair use is a doctrine in United States copyright law that allows limited use of copyrighted material without requiring permission from the rights holders, such as commentary, criticism, news reporting, research, teaching or scholarship. It provides for the legal, non-licensed citation or incorporation of copyrighted material in another author’s work under a four-factor balancing test.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This